Category Archives: News/Nouvelles

Christie Blatchford: Canada couldn’t have taken Vimy without citizen soldiers

Christie Blatchford: Canada couldn’t have taken Vimy without citizen soldiers
Christie Blatchford | April 9, 2017 | Last Updated: Apr 10 8:03 AM ET

The Vimy 100th anniversary ceremony, televised live Sunday morning, was so Canadian in the
tepid modern manner that it could have been designed by the CBC, not merely broadcast by it.
Held at the gorgeous Walter Allward-designed limestone memorial in France on the piece of
land that is by dint of blood a part of Canada, the government-planned show featured trilingual
singers, children’s choirs, dancers, Canadian performers all acting out the story. Suitably sombre
politicians and dignitaries gave predictable speeches and said predictable things.
Aside from the setting, a few nods to the fact that Vimy was the first time the four divisions of
the Canadian Corps had fought together, a bagpiper, a little military music — and of course the
names of the dead on the walls – it could have passed for any Ottawa-centric bit of business.

photo 1

Jack Taylor/Getty ImagesCanadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Prince William, Duke of
Cambridge and Prince Harry arrive at the Canadian National Vimy Memorial on April 9, 2017

There was no mention that I heard or saw of the 40 infantry and armoured regiments, which
came from every corner of the country, who now carry Vimy 1917 as either a battle honour or a
guidon (which the armoured regiments carry in lieu of a colour).
They are:
— The 48th Highlanders of Canada (Toronto, Ont.)
— The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada (Princess Louise’s) (Hamilton, Ont.)
— The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada (Montreal, Que.)
— The Calgary Highlanders (Calgary, Alta.)
— The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (Ottawa, Ont.)
— The Canadian Grenadier Guards (Montreal, Que.)
— The Canadian Scottish Regiment (Princess Mary’s) (Victoria, B.C.)
— The Cape Breton Highlanders (Sydney, N.S.)
— The Essex and Kent Scottish Regiment (Windsor, Ont.)
— Governor General’s Foot Guards (Ottawa, Ont.)
— The Lake Superior Scottish Regiment (Thunder Bay, Ont.)
— The Loyal Edmonton Regiment (Edmonton, Alta.)
— The North Saskatchewan Regiment (Saskatoon, Sask.)
— The Nova Scotia Highlanders (Truro, N.S.)
— The Princess of Wales’ Own Regiment (Kingston, Ont.)
— Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (Edmonton, Alta., and Shilo, Man.)
— The Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada (Winnipeg, Man.)
— The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada (Toronto, Ont.)
— Royal 22nd Regiment (Valcartier, Quebec City, Laval, Saint-Hyacinthe, Que.)
— The Royal Canadian Regiment (Petawawa and London, Ont. and Gagetown, N.B.)
— The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Hamilton, Ont.)
— The Royal Montreal Regiment (Montreal, Que.)
— The Royal New Brunswick Regiment (Fredericton, N.B.)
— The Royal Regiment of Canada (Toronto, Ont.)
— The Royal Regina Rifles (Regina, Sask.)
— The Royal Westminster Regiment (New Westminster, B.C.)
— Royal Winnipeg Rifles (Winnipeg, Man.)
— The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada (Vancouver, B.C.)
— The Toronto Scottish Regiment (Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother’s Own) (Mississauga,
Ont.)
— 1st Hussars (London, Ont.)
— The British Columbia Dragoons (Kelowna, B.C.)
— The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own) (Vancouver, B.C.)
— The Governor General’s Horse Guards (Toronto, Ont.)
— The King’s Own Calgary Regiment (Calgary, Alta.)
— The Ontario Regiment (Oshawa, Ont.)
— The Queen’s York Rangers (1st American Regiment) (Toronto, Ont.)
— The Royal Canadian Hussars (Montreal, Que.)
— The Saskatchewan Dragoons (Moose Jaw, Sask.)
— The Sherbrooke Hussars (Sherbrooke, Que.)
— The South Alberta Light Horse (Medicine Hat, Alta.)
The regiments are the everyday keepers of memory and tradition, as a wise friend reminds me,
those who “through their own voluntary service have taken on that sacred task of keeping the
memory and honour alive in perpetuity.”
From Kelowna to Sydney, they were urban and rural, French and English, immigrant and
indigenous Canadian, but at Vimy Ridge, on that battlefield of corpses, boot deep in mud,
deafened by artillery, they didn’t fight as hyphenated Canadians.
It was enough that they all were Canadian, period.
It still is.
Of the 40 regiments with Vimy colours or guidons, 37 are reserve units, what used to be called
the militia.
The troops are part-time soldiers, citizen soldiers. Many are still in school, or work regular jobs
and parade a night a week and the weekend at the armoury. These young men and women are
among the best, smartest and proudest in the country.
Canada couldn’t have taken Vimy Ridge without citizen soldiers. Canada couldn’t have been in
Afghanistan for nearly a decade without citizen soldiers.

photo 2

Library and Archives Canada Bringing in the wounded at Vimy Ridge in April 1917.

And yet, unacknowledged publicly, the reserve regiments are starving. Funding for the military
generally has been shrinking since the end of the Afghanistan mission in 2010, but the reserve, as
ever, bears more than its share of the burden — thanks not to government, but to the bureaucrats
in the regular army who have been waging a quiet war against the reserves for years.
A Department of National Defence report earlier this year showed the reserves have 5,293 vacant
positions, most in the army reserve. That’s 25 per cent under strength.
This is how it worked.
Say, a reserve unit might lose 20 men and women a year to attrition and the like; it was allowed
to recruit only five new people: thus, every year, the unit was down by 15 people. That’s gone on
for five years.
The abysmal recruiting policy — it was centralized, with the result that applicants could wait
years — has been handed back to the regiments. But the reserves have been told their budgets
this year will be 10 per cent less than they received last year when the whole institution was short
25 per cent of its authorized number of soldiers.
It’s funny, but as Prince Charles said Sunday of Vimy, “This was Canada at its best,” and it was:
politicians, leaders, the army, and most of all the troops. As my wise friend reminds me, “It was
service before self. We could do anything.”
The scale of accomplishment and sacrifice at Vimy Ridge merits more than saccharine
remembrance, particularly that even as it unfolds, the very regiments that gave so much are once
again in jeopardy.
cblatchford@postmedia.com


RICHARD MADAN, 2016 ROSS MUNRO MEDIA AWARD (RMMA) RECIPIENT

RICHARD MADAN

2016 ROSS MUNRO MEDIA AWARD (RMMA) RECIPIENT

OTTAWA, ON, JANUARY 27th, 2017 – The Conference of Defence Associations and the CDA Institute are pleased to announce that, in a unanimous decision by a selection committee of 7 members, CTV Richard Madan has been selected as the recipient of the CDA Institute Ross Munro Media Award for 2016.

“Canadian journalists continue to play a crucial role in our open society, and we are delighted that this year’s recipient, Richard Madan, has gained the respect and recognition of the community as he covered important security and defence issues, and continues in the best example set by Ross Munro,” says Denis Rouleau, Chair of the Conference of Defence Associations and Chair of this year’s RMMA Selection Committee.

“I’m honored to receive this prestigious award.  It’s a recognition how the power of journalism changed government policies to help the lives of injured veterans,” says the 2016 RMMA Recipient, Richard Madan.

Background

Madan worked as a policy aide to various MPs on Parliament Hill while studying Political Science at Carleton University.  But soon thereafter, he realized his calling lay elsewhere and began freelance reporting for various print newspapers in the national capital region.  In 2000, Madan moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba, to be the Legislature Reporter for the Global News team, then the CBC.

In 2005, Madan returned to Ontario joining CityNews as the station’s Political Specialist based in Toronto.  In 2010, he joined CTV National News as a Parliamentary Correspondent, covering federal politics, policy, and national elections.

In 2016, Madan accepted the position of Washington, DC, Correspondent for CTV News, a position he currently holds.

An accomplished journalist, Madan has covered dozens of events at home and abroad.  Of note, is his in-depth coverage of ill and injured Canadian Armed Forces personnel returning from Afghanistan and the challenges they face when suffering from a Post-Traumatic Stress Injury (PTSI).

Through these reports on veteran issues, Madan contributed to changes in regulations, policies, awareness and better treatment of veterans and their families and all those affected by PTSI.

The Ross Munro Media Award commemorates Ross Munro, the celebrated Canadian war correspondent who reported on the Second World War in Europe. The Award was initiated by the Conference of Defence Associations in 2002 (and since 2015 jointly presented by the CDA and the CDA Institute) to recognize Canadian journalists who have made a significant and extraordinary contribution to increasing public understanding of Canadian security and defence matters. Recipients of the award have produced outstanding work regarding the efforts of the Canadian Armed Forces in preserving Canadian democratic values. The award consists of a replica of the Ross Munro statue and a cheque for $2,000.

Previous recipients of the Award are Stephen Thorne (2002), Garth Pritchard (2003), Sharon Hobson (2004), Bruce Campion-Smith (2005), Christie Blatchford (2006), Matthew Fisher (2007), Alec Castonguay (2008), Brian Stewart (2009), Murray Brewster (2010), Rosie DiManno (2011), Adam Day (2012), (there was no recipient for 2013), Louie Palu (2014), and Christina MacLean (2015).

The Selection Committee was chaired by Vice-Admiral Denis Rouleau (Ret’d), Chair of the Conference of Defence Associations (CDA). Members of the Selection Committee were Jamie Carroll, CDA Institute Board Member; Francoise Gagnon, ADGA; Daniel Gosselin, CDA Institute Chair of the BOD; Grant McDonald, KPMG; Christina MacLean, Front-Line Defence magazine; and Stuart Robertson, O’Donnell, Robertson & Sanfilippo.

The award will be presented on Thursday, 16 February 2017, during the first day of the jointly-organized CDA and CDA Institute’s Ottawa Conference on Security and Defence to be held at the Shaw Centre.

Conference Registration is available here.

Please direct any enquiries regarding the Ross Munro Media Award (RMMA) to Tony Battista, Chief Executive Officer of the CDA and the CDA Institute, at ceo@cda-cdainstitute.ca.

RICHARD MADAN

LAUREAT DU PRIX DE JOURNALISME ROSS MUNRO DE 2016

OTTAWA, ONT., LE VENDREDI 27 JANVIER 2017 - La Conférence des Associations de la défense et l’Institut de la CAD sont heureux d’annoncer que, à l’unanimité par un jury de 7 membres, M. Richard Madan de CTV a été sélectionné comme lauréat du prix médias Ross Munro de l’Institut de la CAD pour 2016.

« Nos Journalistes canadiens et canadiennes continuent de jouer un rôle crucial dans notre société, et nous sommes très heureux que le lauréat, M. Richard Madan, s’est mérité le respect et la reconnaissance de la communauté grâce à sa couverture médiatique touchant les enjeux de la sécurité et de défense, et poursuit l’exemple établi par M. Ross Munro, » dit Denis Rouleau, Président de la CAD, et président du comité de sélection pour le prix médias Ross Munro.

« Je suis honoré de recevoir ce prix prestigieux.  C’est une reconnaissance que le pouvoir  journalistique change des politiques gouvernementales pour aider au bien-être des anciens combattants blessés, » dit le lauréat du prix 2016 RMMA, M. Richard Madan.

Historique

Madan a travaillé comme adjoint politique pour différents députés fédéraux sur la colline parlementaire alors qu’il étudiait les sciences politiques à l’université Carleton.  Mais peu après, il réalisa sa vocation et a commencé sa carrière de journaliste comme pigiste pour différents journaux dans la région de la capitale nationale.  En 2000, Madan déménage à Winnipeg (Manitoba), où il occupe le poste de journaliste affecté aux reportages de la législature pour l’équipe de Global News, puis de la SRC.

En 2005, Madan retourne en Ontario pour rejoindre CityNewsTV comme spécialiste de la politique de la station basée à Toronto.  En 2010, il se joint à CTV National News comme correspondant parlementaire, portant sur la politique fédérale, les politiques et les élections nationales.

En 2016, Madan accepte un poste à Washington, DC, où il travaille comme correspondant pour CTV, un poste qu’il occupe à ce jour.

Un journaliste accompli, Madan a couvert des dizaines d’événements au pays ainsi qu’à l’étranger, particulièrement, sa couverture approfondie des enjeux concernant le personnel des Forces armées canadiennes malades ou blessés revenant d’Afghanistan et les défis qu’ils relèvent en souffrant d’une blessure de Stress post-traumatique (BSPT).

Par le biais de ces rapports sur les questions de vétéran, Madan a contribué aux changements de règlements, de politiques, de sensibilisation et au meilleur traitement pour nos anciens combattants et leurs familles et toutes les personnes touchées par la BSPT.

Le Prix Média Ross Munro commémore Ross Munro, le célèbre correspondant de guerre canadien qui fut l’auteur de reportages tout au long de la Seconde Guerre mondiale en Europe. Le prix a été institué en 2002 par la Conférence des associations de la défense (et dépuis 2015 présenté conjointement par la CAD et l’Institut de la CAD) afin de reconnaître des journalistes canadiens qui ont fait une contribution significative et extraordinaire à l’amélioration de la compréhension par les Canadiens des questions de sécurité et de défense. Les récipiendaires du prix ont produit des travaux exceptionnels concernant les efforts des Forces armées canadiennes dans la préservation des valeurs démocratiques canadiennes. Le prix consiste en une réplique de la statue de Ross Munro et un chèque de 2 000 $.

Les récipiendaires précédents du prix sont Stephen Thorne (2002), Garth Pritchard (2003), Sharon Hobson (2004), Bruce Campion-Smith (2005), Christie Blatchford (2006), Matthew Fisher (2007), Alec Castonguay (2008), Brian Stewart (2009), Murray Brewster (2010), Rosie DiManno (2011), Adam Day (2012), (il n’y a pas eu de récipiendaire en 2013) ; Louie Palu (2014) ; et Christina MacLean (2015).

Le comité de sélection était présidé par le Vice-amiral Denis Rouleau (retraité), président de la Conférence des associations de la défense (CAD). Les autres membres du comité étaient : Jamie Carroll, Institut de la CAD ; Françoise Gagnon, ADGA; Président Daniel Gosselin, Président du CA de l’Institut de la CAD; Grant McDonald, KPMG; Christina MacLean, la Revue Front-Line News; et Stuart Robertson, de O’Donnell, Robertson & Sanfilippo.

Le prix sera remis le jeudi, 16 février 2017 au centre Shaw, dans le cadre de la Conférence d’Ottawa sur la sécurité et la défense organisée conjointement par la CAD et l’Institut de la CAD.

Inscription est disponible ici.

Prière d’adresser vos demandes de renseignement par courriel à Tony Battista, président directeur-général de la CAD et de l’Institut de la CAD, à ceo@cda-cdainstitute.ca.

 

 

Tony Battista

Chief Executive Officer/Président Directeur-Général

Conference of Defence Associations/Conférence des Associations de la Défense

CDA Institute/Institut de la CAD

151 rue Slater Street, suite 412A

Ottawa (ON) K1P 5H3

Canada

T: +1 613-236-9903

Email: ceo@cda-cdainstitute.ca

 

The passing of Lieutenant-General Charles H. Belzile, CMM, CD

THE LATE LIEUTENANT-GENERAL CHARLES H. BELZILE, CMM, CD

Lieutenant-General Charles H. Belzile, CMM, CD was born at Trois-Pistoles, Québec on 12 March 1933.  He enrolled in the Canadian Army in 1951 and was commissioned in the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada (QOR of C) on graduation from the University of Montreal in 1953.

He then served as a platoon commander in Korea and on his return as a staff officer at Western Command Headquarters in Edmonton, Alberta from 1955 to 1957.

Returning to regimental duty in 1957, Lieutenant-General Belzile proceeded to Hemer, Germany with 2 QOR of C, where he completed a number of assignments including Captain adjutant.  In January 1961 he began two years as a staff officer at Quebec Command Headquarters in Montreal.  He rejoined 2 QOR of C in Calgary in 1963 and 1 QOR of C in Victoria, B.C., on promotion to Major the following year.

In 1965, after serving with his battalion in Cyprus, he was selected to attend the Canadian Army Staff College in Kingston, Ontario.  He was subsequently assigned as Brigade Major of the 4th Canadian Brigade Group, in Soest, West Germany.

In 1968 on promotion to Lieutenant-Colonel, General Belzile was appointed Commanding Officer of the 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment at the Citadelle de Québec, QC. During this assignment he commanded his unit in Cyprus and in Canada, as well as on manoeuvres in Jamaica.

Following his tour as Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-General Belzile spent two years at Canadian Forces Headquarters in Ottawa as a member of the personnel career planning staff.  On promotion to the rank of Colonel in 1972, Lieutenant-General Belzile was appointed Commandant of the Combat Arms School at Canadian Forces Base Gagetown, New Brunswick.  Promoted to Brigadier-General in 1974, he was appointed Commander 4th Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group stationed in Lahr, Germany.  Following this command appointment, he became Assistant Chief of Staff Operations at Central Army Group Headquarters, Seckenheim in 1976.

In 1977, on promotion to Major-General, Lieutenant-General Belzile took command of Canadian Forces Europe, with Headquarters in Lahr, Germany.

Following two years as Chief Land Doctrine and Operations at National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, Lieutenant-General Belzile was promoted to his present rank on April 1981 and appointed Commander Mobile Command on 16 April 1981 with Headquarters located in St-Hubert, Québec.  He held this appointment until August 1986.  He retired from the Canadian Forces in October l986.

General Belzile was appointed Commander of the Order of Military Merit in 1979.  In 1986, the Government of France recognized his active participation to the betterment of military cooperation between France and Canada, by appointing him Commander of the Légion d’Honneur.

General Belzile was appointed Colonel Commandant, the Royal Canadian Infantry Corps, in 1988, a position he held until September 1992.  He assumed the appointment of Colonel Commandant, The Royal Canadian Army Cadets in October 1992 until May 5th, 1996.

General Belzile was married to the former Janet Scott of Braeside, Ontario.  He had two children, Denise and Suzanne.

 

                                                               

LA FIN DES LIEUTENANT-GÉNÉRAL CHARLES-HENRI BELZILE, CMM, CD

Le Lgén Belzile est né à Trois-Pistoles, Québec le 12 mars 1933.  Il détient un Baccalauréat ès arts de l’Université de Montréal.

En 1951, alors qu’il fréquente l’université, il se joint au Corps-école d’officiers canadien.  Il reçoit son brevet d’officier dans les Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada (QOR of C) en octobre de l’année suivante et, après avoir obtenu son diplôme universitaire en 1953, il est affecté au 2e Bataillon du même régiment, à Esquimalt, Colombie-Britannique.

En 1954-1955, il sert un an en Corée avec son bataillon, puis il est muté au Quartier général du Commandement de l’Ouest, à Edmonton, comme officier de recrutement.  Il retourne au 2e Bataillon des QOR of C, à Esquimalt en 1957, pour ensuite être affecté, d’abord en République fédérale d’Allemagne (R.F.A.), puis à Calgary, toujours avec le 2e Bataillon.

Par la suite, le Lgén Belzile est nommé Officier d’état-major au Commandement de la région du Québec, à Montréal, de décembre 1960 à mai 1963.  Il rejoint ensuite le 2e Bataillon des QOR of C, à Calgary et, en janvier de l’année suivante, il est promu major et affecté au ler Bataillon des QOR of C, à Esquimalt, en tant que commandant de compagnie.  En 1965, il sert avec son unité à Chypre.

En 1965-1966, il étudie au Collège d’état-major de l’Armée canadienne, à Kingston, Ontario et, en novembre 1966, il devient major de brigade au 4e Groupe-brigade d’infanterie canadienne, à Soest (R.F.A.).  Promu lieutenant-colonel en août 1968, il prend alors le commandement du 2e Bataillon du Royal 22e Régiment, à la Citadelle de Québec.  L’année suivante, d’avril à septembre, son bataillon est affecté à la Force de maintien de la paix des Nations unies, à Chypre.

Il est ensuite muté au Quartier général des Forces canadiennes, à Ottawa où il sert comme directeur des carrières (officiers), de 1970-1972.  Puis, en juillet 1972, il est promu colonel et nommé Commandant de l’École des armes de combat, à Gagetown, Nouveau-Brunswick.  En juin 1974, il est promu brigadier-général et muté à Lahr (R.F.A.) en tant que Commandant du 4e Groupe-brigade mécanisé du Canada.

Deux ans plus tard, il devient Chef d’état-major adjoint (Opérations), au Quartier-général du Groupe d’armée du Centre, à Seckenheim (R.F.A.) et, en mai 1977, après avoir été promu major-général, il est muté au Quartier-général des Forces canadiennes Europe, à Lahr, à titre de Commandant.

A son retour au Canada en août 1979, il devient Chef des doctrines et des opérations terrestres au Quartier-général de la Défense nationale, à Ottawa, poste qu’il occupe jusqu’en avril 1981.  Le Lgén Belzile est alors promu à son grade actuel et nommé Commandant de la Force mobile à Saint-Hubert, Québec.

Le Lgén Belzile s’est retiré des FC en 1986 après une carrière distinguée de 35 ans.  En reconnaissance de son service méritoire et de son dévouement au travail, il se voit décerner l’Ordre du Mérite Militaire, grade commandeur, il est reçu de l’Ordre de Saint-Jean, au grade de frère officier et il est fait commandeur de la Légion d’honneur, de premier ordre de la République française.

Le Lgén Belzile a été appointé comme Colonel commandant du Corps de l’Infanterie le 2 octobre 1988.  Appointement qu’il a occupé jusqu’au mois de septembre 1992.  Au mois d’octobre 1992, il est appointé Colonel Commandant des Cadets Royaux de l’Armée canadienne jusqu’au 5 mai 1996.

Le Lgén Belzile a été marié à Janet Scott de Braeside, Ontario. Il avait deux enfants, Denise et Suzanne.

Top Candidate of Rifle Section Commander Course 1605

Top Candidate of Rifle Section Commander Course 1605, MCpl J. Schmidt 3 RCR, being presented the Top Candidate award and receiving the CIA coin by CWO M.C. (Mike) Hamilton RSM Infantry School – 5 CDSB Gagetown, CWO Royal Canadian Infantry Corps Canadian Armed Forces

 

coin plaque

Infantry-Corps-Newsletter-Volume-2-Issue-2

Infantry Corps Newsletter – Volume 2, Issue 2 final

Top candidates from three Infantry Officer Development Period 1.1 courses are presented with the CIA Sword.

 

LCol A.D. (Alex) Haynes Commandant, Infantry School presents swords to each top candidate yesterday in the field at Enniskillen Range immediately prior to the platoon live fire attack range. Joining him in presenting swords was the Inf Sch DSM, MWO Rick Yuskiw.

 

TC 1601 Robinson

IODP 1.1 Course 1601 – 2Lt J.P. Robinson (Jesse), Infantry School

TC 1602 Takach

IODP 1.1 Course 1602 – 2Lt T.N. Takach (Trevor), 4 CDSB (he’s commissioned from the Ranks – formerly RCR)

TC 1603 Roy

IODP 1.1 Course 1603 – 2Lt C.S.A. Roy (Caroline), Fusiliers du St Laurent

 


Rifle Section Commander Course, Top Candidate (Serial 1603 and Serial 1604)

Rifle Section Commander Course, Top Candidate (serial 1603) MCpl Germain, from 4 Div and Top Candidate(Serial 1604)  MCpl Burton, 2 PPCLI from 3 Div  was awarded medallion and coin provided by the CIA, and plaque provided by the Infantry School.

top c

Top Candidate (Serial 1603) MCpl Germain, from 4 Div

ser 1604

Top Candidate(Serial 1604) MCpl Burton, 2 PPCLI from 3 Div

 

CANADIAN ARMY CORPS, REGIMENTS, BRANCH DIRECTORS AND CWO

CANFORGEN 096/16 COMD CA 016/16 031330Z JUN 16

CANADIAN ARMY CORPS, REGIMENTS, BRANCH DIRECTORS AND CWO

UNCLASSIFIED

REF: CAO 11-93

1.    I AM PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE FOLLOWING CANADIAN ARMY CORPS, REGIMENTS, BRANCH DIRECTORS AND CWO (READ IN THREE COLUMNS: POSN, NAME, EFFECTIVE DATE):

A.    CANADIAN ARMY CORPS, REGT, AND BR DIR:

(1) DIRECTOR ROYAL CANADIAN ARMOURED CORPS (DIR RCAC), COL CROSS, 21 JULY 2016

(2) DIRECTOR THE ROYAL REGIMENT OF CANADIAN ARTILLERY (DIR RCA), COL BISHOP, REMAINS

(3) DIRECTOR THE CORPS OF ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS (DIR RCE), COL BASINGER, REMAINS

(4) DIRECTOR THE ROYAL CANADIAN CORPS OF SIGNALS (DIR RCCS), COL SULLIVAN, REMAINS

(5) DIRECTOR ROYAL CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS (DIR RCIC), COL ERRINGTON, 18 FEBRUARY 2016

(A) DIRECTOR THE ROYAL CANADIAN REGIMENT (DIR RCR), COL SCOTT, REMAINS

(B) DIRECTOR PRINCESS PATRICIA S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY (DIR PPCLI), COL RITCHIE, 15 JULY 2016

(C) DIRECTOR ROYAL 22E REGIMENT OFF (DIR R22ER OFF), COL ST- LOUIS, REMAINS

(D) DIRECTOR ROYAL 22E REGIMENT NCM (DIR R22ER NCM), COL DEMERS, REMAINS

(6) DIRECTOR THE CORPS OF ROYAL CANADIAN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERS (DIR RCEME), COL HAMILTON, REMAINS

(7) DIRECTOR CANADIAN ARMY LOGISTICS BRANCH (DIR CA LOG BR), COL OSMOND, REMAINS

(8) DIRECTOR CANADIAN ARMY INTELLIGENCE BRANCH (DIR CA INT BR), COL DESJARDINS, 1 DECEMBER 2015

B.    CANADIAN ARMY CORPS, REGT AND BR CWO:

(1) CWO ROYAL CANADIAN ARMOURED CORPS (CWO RCAC), CWO LAUGHLIN, REMAINS

(2) CWO THE ROYAL REGIMENT OF CANADIAN ARTILLERY (RSM RCA), CWO BEAUDRY, REMAINS

(3) CWO THE CORPS OF ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS (CWO RCE), CWO CROUCHER, REMAINS

(4) CWO THE ROYAL CANADIAN CORPS OF SIGNALS (CWO RCCS), CWO RICHER, REMAINS

(5) CWO ROYAL CANADIAN INFANTRY CORPS (CWO RCIC), CWO HAMILTON, 15 JUNE 2016

(A) RSM THE ROYAL CANADIAN REGIMENT (RSM RCR), CWO HARTNELL, REMAINS

(B) RSM PRINCESS PATRICIA S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY (RSM PPCLI), CWO STEVENS, REMAINS

(C) RSM ROYAL 22E REGIMENT (RSM R22ER), CWO COLBERT, REMAINS

(6) SM THE CORPS OF ROYAL CANADIAN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERS (SM RCEME), CWO WALHIN, 3 JUNE 2016

(7) CWO CANADIAN ARMY LOGISTICS BRANCH (CWO CA LOG BR), CWO PEARSON, REMAINS

(8) CWO CANADIAN ARMY INTELLIGENCE BRANCH (CWO CA INT BR), CWO LAFONTAINE, 1 DECEMBER 2015

2.    PLEASE ENSURE THE WIDEST DISTRIBUTION OF THIS INFO

 

Canadian Army HCol Appointment list, updated as of 26 May 2016

20160526_Unclassified_5400-2_DLPM_G1_Reference_SHORT LIST – Master List of Army Honouraries_eng

Auditor General Highlights Problems with Canadian Army Reserve Units

The auditor general identifies the critical shortage of soldiers in the Army Reserve, their lack of equipment and proper training all of which lead to disenchantment and dwindling numbers.  Reserve Force members have long been aware of these problems.  Regular Force members should also be concerned as the Reserve Army provides necessary backup which takes longer to prepare and train given the part-time nature of the Reserve.

The first written by Amanda Connolly, in ipolitics, 3 May 2016,

See: http://ipolitics.ca/2016/05/03/canadian-forces-army-reserve-lacks-soldiers-training-resources-ag-ac/

And this one from the Canadian Press, thanks to : Brian Koshul

Auditor General highlights problems with Canadian Army’s reserve units Canadian Press, May 3, 2016 Auditor General Michael Ferguson’s latest audit conducted a detailed examination of the problems faced by the Military’s part-time branch and found that even though there are 21,000 positions on the books, only 13,944 Reservists are considered active and ready for service. The federal government’s stated goal is to have a Reserve Force of 27,000. The audit goes into detail about how National Defence has not only failed to recruit for the part-time force, but Reservists are quitting at a rate faster than they can be replaced and doing so before they are fully trained. “In late 2015, National Defence set a goal to increase the Army Reserve by 950 soldiers (five per cent) by 2019. In our opinion, this goal will be difficult to achieve given the present rate of attrition,” said the Auditor’s report. The sweeping review also looked at training and found that many Reservists don’t receive certain basic weapons training, such as the use of a pistol or grenade launcher. They have been woefully unprepared for some duties in combat zones, such as convoy escort and force protection, and ill-equipped for missions at home like responding to forest fires and floods. When there is a domestic emergency, Reserve units are expected to assemble trained units of up to 600 soldiers, but Ferguson’s report noted that they were thrown into the field over the last few years – specifically in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba – without everything they needed, including essential items. “When we reviewed these reports, we found many instances of key equipment lacking, such as reconnaissance vehicles, command posts, and communications equipment,” the audit said. “We found that the Canadian Army has not defined the list of equipment that all Army Reserve units should have for training their soldiers and teams for domestic missions. This means that Army Reserve units may have to rely on other Canadian Armed Forces units to provide this equipment, but we were told that it is often not available.” The former Harper government was keen on highlighting the participation of Reservists, notably the Canadian Rangers, in annual Arctic exercises. In 2013, it staged a series of photo-ops with then-Prime Minister Stephen Harper shooting rifles and mingling with the troops, who are drawn from indigenous northern communities. The audit says the Army made a special effort to equip them, but even there Ferguson’s report found support wanting. “Following recent training exercises, these groups reported that they did not always have access to the equipment they needed to be self-sufficient, such as reliable communications and vehicles larger than light snowmobiles,” said the report. National Defence, in its response, agreed with the criticism and said it is working on the equipment issue. Ferguson also tore a strip off the government over how it balances and pays for Reservists, some of who are being called up to full-time duty. Under the law, a part-time soldier can be converted to full-time status for periods of between 180 days and three years. But those jobs can be -and often are – renewed for longer periods of time. It was one of the criticisms in retired Lieutenant-General Andrew Leslie’s 2011 report, which was meant to overhaul administration at National Defence. Ferguson’s report goes a step further showing that as many as 1,704 part-time soldiers are on full-time duty, but the money to pay for them is being taken from the Reserve budget. “This means that the Canadian Army spent about 27 per cent of its overall Army Reserve pay and operating expenses on these full-time contracts, leaving less available for other Army Reserve activities,” said the report.